Scott Blasingame Appeals to the Vulnerable & Lonely-Featured Image

Scott Blasingame Appeals to the Vulnerable & Lonely

I received a copy of this book from the author to review but I was not financially compensated in any way. The opinions expressed are my own, are honest, and are based on my observations while reading this novel.

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Poetry is a finicky thing, isn’t it? I find people have harsh opinions with poetry. You can either like it or hate it. There is no in-between. I don’t find this to be true, though. I always read poems with an open mind because poetry is subjective, it’s personal. And the most interesting difference between poems and stories is that the meaning changes depending on the person who is reading the poem. This is not typically the case with reading a book.

Today I am going to be telling you about Dregs of Wit And Wisdom, a poetry collection book by Scott Blasingame. I will also go over who the author is and what my thoughts were as I read his poetry.

About The Book

Dregs of Wit and Wisdom book cover
  • Dregs of Wit and Wisdom
  • Author: Scott Blasingame
  • Genre: Poetry
  • Release Date: January 24, 2014
  • Format: Kindle & Paperback
  • 303 pages
  • Book blurb pulled from Goodreads

This is a collection of poetry amassed over the course of a decade of personal dredging and wroth with wry wit and world-weary wisdom. At least it is hoped anyone reading it will find it so to some extent or in some way. To be found are musings of emotion and experience observed beneath the lens of a verbal microscope. Some take the form of essays, some stories, some characterizations, some light verse, and some random snippets. From all that are thoughts and truths that are bittersweet and admissions both funny and forlorn sifted from the muck and mire of one man’s mental state.

Enjoy it for what it is: the observations, opining, and outpouring from a heart’s abyss.

About The Author

Scott Blasingame Author Picture

Author bio pulled from Amazon

Scott Blasingame is the author of “The Warrior-Son” saga and “The NightDragon” series as well as other fictional and nonfictional works.

An avid reader since childhood, his primary influences are Zane Grey, Edgar Rice Burroughs, and Robert E. Howard, but he also enjoys biographies, autobiographies, ancient history, and the works of Dennis Lehane, Lee Child, Andrew Vachss, Stephen King, and Robert McCammon to name a few.

He also believes comic books are a form of literature. He is a film buff, especially of the martial arts genre, and a big fan of animation fare. He has worked as a land surveyor and photographer, and at one point studied Northern Shaolin Kung Fu for almost 10 years.

As a writer, he strives to bring forth interesting characters with good development, plots filled with tension and intrigue, and thrilling action scenes with intricate fight sequences that take the reader into the heart of combat.

He also likes to construct heroic characters with a sense of morality and honor, though still subject to moments of flawed human decisions and actions.

Goodreads | Facebook

Book Review

What I thought about the book before and right when I started reading

Contemplative

Woman contemplating

There were 5 poems I liked and commented on within this section of the poetry collection book. They were:

  1. Dream Another Dream
  2. Everybody Says
  3. Expectation
  4. Just Suppose
  5. Melancholy Me

Dream Another Dream was simple, and it rhymed well. If it were spoken out loud, it would sound good on the tongue.

Everybody Says caught my attention because of two things he says in the poem that is also what has been said to me. I thought this poem fit well with the section “Contemplative” because that’s exactly what he is expressing. In the poem, he was lost in thought about what people tell him he is or should be. This is a poem I think you could relate to. Or anyone, really.

Expectation is another relatable poem. One stanza in particular which says:

I feel I will never
Be my own boss.
I work for his gain
And die in my loss
Expectation by Scott Blasingame in Dregs of Wit and Wisdom
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There was another stanza which was in Scott Blasingame’s poem, Just Suppose, which made me think Dr. Seuss had written it. Just as much, the poem held excellent advice that everyone should follow. Just Suppose is all about risk and reward. Essentially, sometimes you need to take that risk or face your fears.

Lastly was Melancholy Me. He mentions Edgar Allan Poe in this poem but only refers to him as Poe. Still, I knew exactly who he was talking about. I thought it was so funny how someone can just mention Edgar Allan Poe by his last name, and everyone knows who it is.

Overall, this section was okay. There were several poems but only 5 had caught my attention. Of course, I believe that if you were to read through the “Contemplative” section, you may have found other poems that piqued your interest.

Cosmic

Photo of an eye in the universe
Cosmic Poetry: Thoughts, feelings, and ideas about the universe

Scott Blasingame’s cosmic poetry section was very short. It only had 4 poems, but it was still interesting to me. Before Dregs of Wit and Wisdom, I didn’t even know that cosmic poetry existed. So what is it? Well, it is what it sounds like. Cosmic poetry is anything that is related to the universe. It can be thoughts and feelings or even ideas about the universe or the poets’ place within the universe.

The first poem in this section asks questions about the universe. Another focuses on the moon. And the other two seem to be more focused on ideas. I found nothing extraordinary about his cosmic poetry. It was simple. I did appreciate it for its introductory value. Before, I had no idea that there was a world where poems specifically dedicated to the cosmos existed. Now I do, so that is worth mentioning.

Dawn

sunset view from a lake

There were 2 poems I liked and commented on within this section of the poetry collection book. They were:

  1. Dawn
  2. Spellbound

Dawn is not only the name of this section, but also of one poem within the section. It is a simple poem about waking up in the morning and the beauty that it holds. The beginning of one stanza of the poem states:

An amber touch
Strokes purple-bellied clouds
Dawn by Scott Blasingame in Dregs of Wit and Wisdom
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That start to the stanza just sounds so nice and it’s very picturesque. I could imagine a painting going alongside this poem.

Spellbound is another poem a few pages after the Dawn poem. I wrote a brief note on this page saying it was cute and passionate. It reminds me of puppy love or when you first meet someone you like and you get those butterflies in your stomach.

Horror

creepy hallway
Image by Peter H from Pixabay

There was only one poem I liked and commented on within this section of the poetry collection book. I’m not at all surprised by this because it takes a lot for me into enjoy anything from the horror genre. This is because I want to feel chills at the very least or get a creepy vibe from what I am reading or viewing.

I didn’t get this from any of Scott Blasingame’s poems. However, he had one poem called Moon Night that was pretty good. As I read the poem, I felt as though I were reading a journal excerpt of a werewolf. It was intriguing, and now I wish there were a book out there like that. If you know of one, let me know about it in the comments! Or you could take this as a prompt and write a book that follows this idea. It is one I would read immediately!

Related: Read my book reviews of The Patience of a Dead Man, Dead Woman Scorned, and Anger Is An Acid

Love

Picture of a rose on pages

Again, only a single poem was worth commenting on within this section of the poetry collection book. I am quite surprised because I would consider myself to be a bit of a hopeless romantic, so I thought there would be a ton to talk about.

A poem called The Romantic is worth mentioning to me not because of its romantic prose, but because one of the stanza’s made me laugh. I know, I wasn’t expecting it either. Once I read it, I immediately read it to my man. Here it is for you:

“Oh you’ll know it
When it comes”
Not me, I’m na├»ve
And pretty dumb
The Romantic by Scott Blasingame in Dregs of Wit and Wisdom
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I thought this was funny because it was relatable. You have probably felt this way once or twice before. Love is complicated and the movies and stories make it seem easy.

Personally, I enjoy the books that show the complexities of loving another human being, and that seems to be Scott Blasingame’s specialty.

Lovelorn

I thought this section should have just combined with the previous one of this poetry collection book. I found two poems within that I thought I should bring to your attention. They are Blue Valentine and The Past.

Blue Valentine is a cute poem about not having someone to call yours on Valentine’s Day. This has happened to most of us at one point. Personally, I don’t much care for valentine’s day but i do like the chocolates. Still, I think the poem was less about the holiday and more about the feeling of wanting someone. Overall, this poem made me happy to have my man!

The Past is one of many of Scott Blasingame’s love poems, but it is the only one that sounds like a tongue twister. I read it out loud after reading through it once in my head because I was curious to see if I could do it. I succeeded, but it took some effort. I like tongue twisters though, so it was fun.

Scott Blasingame’s love poems mostly comprise a feeling of wanting. This is nice for people who feel that way, but I would have loved to see more variety. Love can bring out so many emotions, so seeing love poems that expressed those would have been phenomenal.

Mental

Dregs of Wit and Wisdom by Scott Blasingame Pin

There were 2 poems I liked and commented on within this section of the poetry collection book. They were Sick and Spectrum.

Sick is a very short poem that you could easily read in less than a minute. But that doesn’t take away its quality. His wordplay within this poem was excellent and clever. I would not have expected someone to explain the internal struggle that is one’s mind in so short a poem. Especially when this poem specifically targets depression. But the poem was written well. It succinctly gives the description, and one of my favorite lines was:

Medicinal cures for a body so frail
I wish they could by cerebral ail
Sick by Scott Blasingame in Dregs of Wit and Wisdom
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The other poem; Spectrum, addresses another important issue. This was arguably one of his most creative poems in the book. He used color as the premise of the poem. I give high praise for this poem and I think it is one that you should most definitely read!

Nature

Trail in the woods

I actually didn’t write any annotations for this part of the book. Not that it was bad. I quite enjoyed reading through his poems about nature. They were calm and very visual.

The poems made me want to bust out my paints and use Scott Blasingame’s words as inspiration. Unfortunately, I am not home at the moment so I do not have my paints, pencils, sketchpads, or canvases.

Maybe when I arrive home again, I will refer to his poems about nature and see what happens.

Odes

This is another section where I do not have thoughts on any specific poem. I do, however, have thoughts on the section itself. Odes is a very personal section. It was the most well written. It beautifully told other people’s stories, and I think you would find it to be meaningful. And perhaps it would be helpful too if you have recently lost someone.

People

This was the section I was the most excited to read. I am a big people watcher, so I was curious about what Scott Blasingame would have to say. He did not disappoint either. Today I will quickly go over three of my favorite poems from this section:

  1. The Almighty Dollar
  2. The American Scrooge
  3. Psychodrama

Ah, The Almighty Dollar. This is easily my favorite poem of his. It rings true for too many people. I will not soon forget this poem because I have the same opinion. I highly recommend you read this and share it with others. If you get Scott Blasingame’s book for no other reason, get it to read this poem. There is too much faith put into money and I understand why. However, that paper should not be put above all else.

Equally good is his poem, The American Scrooge. It goes along the same lines, but to me it takes a more corporate approach. Or perhaps it takes on the view of the infamous 1% (not all of them are bad though, or think this way, I hope).

When I read this poem, I imagined it to go in conjunction of The Almighty Dollar. That the point of view in The American Scrooge was that of someone who puts money first and foremost.

Religious

Honestly, it surprised me to see any religious poems because I feel like people are touchy with that topic. I didn’t mind it because I am a christian. However, I know not everyone is. Scott Blasingame wrote relatively few in this section compared to the rest of the book so you can easily skip it if you want to.

That is one of the pleasant things about reading from a poetry collection book. You can bounce all over without misunderstanding what’s going on. Each poem has its own story, so you are free to read from any point in the book.

Stories

Read this section! I thoroughly enjoyed reading through these poems because it was like reading snippets of all kinds of different novels. I wish there had been more poems placed within this part of the book. Reading through these made me think he could be better at story telling than at poetry (but don’t tell him that). The poems just felt incredibly creative and fun. Overall, worth the read!

Women

Dregs of Wit and Wisdom book review pin

Do you find people write about women about more than men? Maybe I’m biased because I am a woman. Either way, there were 5 poems I liked and commented on within this section of the poetry collection book. They were:

  1. If Not Her
  2. Mysteria
  3. Senorita
  4. Serenade
  5. Wonder

This section is the last of the author’s titled works. If Not Her is the second poem in and I thought that the first few lines were worth mentioning because they just sound cozy.

In a warm velvet whisper,
Her breath caresses my cheek
Like a satin sheet.
If Not Her by Scott Blasingame in Dregs of Wit and Wisdom
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Doesn’t that just want to make you snuggle up in bed? Anyway, the very next poem was also worth mentioning. It is called Mysteria, and I liked it for two reasons. One was that there was some clever wordplay throughout the poem. Second, one statement made me curious what the author meant. He said:

She enjoys dressing up
in the skins of other women
and acting out of character.
Mysteria by Scott Blasingame in Dregs of Wit and Wisdom
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On one hand, this reminds me of mystique from X-Men. On the other, there could be a deeper meaning behind it. I don’t know; I feel like this could be such a good discussion point in an English class or something.

Next up were the poems Senorita and Serenade. Honestly, the Senorita poem just reminded me of the song by Camila Cabello (super catchy if you haven’t heard it before). And the serenade song was super good because it used music terminology as the basis of the poem.

It reminded me of the poem I had discussed earlier called Spectrum. That poem used color while this one used music. It’s a neat concept that I haven’t seen before.

Last, was a poem called Woman, which is just another one of Scott Blasingame’s poems that is both cute and sweet.

Untitled Works

Honestly, I was not impressed with the author’s untitled works. You can obviously tell that he is a hopeless romantic and has hard times in life, particularly with love. Still, these poems could have been left out of the book. They just weren’t interesting enough to capture my attention. The book would have been better off ending on the last titled work than moving into his untitled works.

Star Rating

A Poetry Collection Book Review Pin

Dregs of Wit and Wisdom is a poetry collection book that has hidden gems interlaced throughout it. I found novel forms of poetry (like the cosmic poetry) that I have never heard of before. I also found something unique about this book. Scott Blasingame’s poetry made me feel like I was reading from his own journal.

After reading this book, I feel like I somewhat know the author. It is a very personal book I think anyone could find interesting. It is absolutely perfect for reading intermittently. Overall, I would say that I recommend it to anyone slightly interested in poetry.

Read Dregs of Wit & Wisdom Now!

This is a collection of poetry amassed over the course of a decade of personal dredging and wroth with wry wit and world-weary wisdom. At least it is hoped anyone reading it will find it so to some extent or in some way. To be found are musings of emotion and experience observed beneath the lens of a verbal microscope.

Some take the form of essays, some stories, some characterizations, some light verse, and some random snippets. From all that, our thoughts and truths that are bittersweet and admissions both funny and forlorn sifted from the muck and mire of one man’s mental state. Enjoy it for what it is: the observations, opining, and outpouring from a heart’s abyss.

Let’s Talk About It!

Today I went over a poetry collection book called Dregs of Wit and Wisdom. The title alone made me curious to read. I told you about the book, who the author is, and lastly, what my thoughts were on the book. I covered each section in the book so that you would know if this is the book for you. If you have an interest in poetry at all, this is worth trying.

After spewing all of my thought, I would like to hear some of yours. What do you think about the Mysteria statement I mentioned earlier? Leave a comment and let me know!

With love

Alexis M.

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